Clear Palisades, 1987 Linda MacDonald 92x92"

Clear Palisades, 1987 Linda MacDonald 92x92"

The California Art Quilt Revolution: From the Summer of Love to the New Millennium (Turner, Gilliland&Finlayson Galleries)

October 7-January 15, 2017

In the last decades of the 20th century, California quilt makers charted new territory in quilt making, leading the nation in creativity and innovation. During the 1970s and 1980s, California artists were among the first to embrace the quilt medium as their primary means of expression. More traditional quilt makers also expanded horizons, creating original designs based on traditional quilt patterns. This exhibition includes works by pioneers of the art quilt movement such as Jean Ray Laury, Yvonne Porcella, Joan Schulze and Therese May, who pushed the boundaries of what could be called a quilt, and highlights late 20th and 21st century artists working in the quilt medium.

 

Her Tapestry, Mary Ellen Latino

Her Tapestry, Mary Ellen Latino

Anything Goes: An Exhibit of Art Cloth Network (Porcella Gallery)

November 30, 2016 - January 15, 2017

The Art Cloth Network is a group of professional artists who promote the medium of cloth as an art form.  The cloth is a surface transformed. Color, line, shape, texture, value, or fiber is added or subtracted to create a compelling composition for deeply personal storytelling and life reflections. Limitless opportunities are explored: dyeing, painting, foiling, folding, photo manipulating, stitching, and layering.  From afar, they are riveting abstract works. Up close the methods used are extraordinary in their diversity and experimentation. Emotions are worked out through holes burned into flannel, creative cutting and stitching, photo manipulation and layering, dyed fragments, and paint re-touching.

 

 

hmong Story Cloths: Stitching a History (Hallway)

October 7, 2016 through January 15, 2017

Chronicling the lives of the Hmong people of Laos, Story Cloths are vibrant and intricate needlework that developed out of refugee camps following the Vietnam War. As an alternative to written language, village women would stitch cloth at night  to document and communicate the story of their daily lives: collecting water, harvesting, transforming hemp into fabric- and also the highlights of their lives: escaping a great flood, New Year festivities, and marriage rituals.  The story cloths offer an intimate view into the cultural legacy and resilience of the Hmong people.

Join Author Linda Gerdner on Sunday November 6 at 1pm to 2pm for a lecture, reading and book signing.

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