Artist in Residence Program

The San Jose Museum of Quilts & Textiles' Artist in Residence program began in October 2016 with an incredible response from the local community, Museum Members, and Visitors.  We host an artist or collaborative group every three months. Artists have an onsite open studio during their three month residency in our newly renovated Maker Space. Our AIR program also provides exhibition space for each artist in our Maker Space Gallery.

 

bhbh.jpg

ALISE ANDERSON

jULY 11 - AUgust 17, 2018

Open Studio Hours
Wed - Fri, 11 AM - 3:30 PM
(Studio closed July 18 - 20)

Alise Anderson was born in Houston, Texas. From 2007 to 2009 she studied Modern Dance Performance and Choreography at Utah Valley University. Later receiving a certificate in Directing and Producing at Berkeley Digital Film Institute. With her work, there is a subtle humor in everything she creates, even if it stems from a darker memory, story or feeling. She uses traditional fiber art practices, often painstaking and time-consuming, labors of love to tell these stories, adding another layer to the work's interplay between things tender (soft) and severe. Her work has been featured in KnitWit Magazine and Kole Magazine. Anderson currently lives and works in Oakland.

 


margaret timbrel 1.jpg

 

MARGARET TIMBRELL

october - december 2018

Margaret Timbrell uses humor in her embroidery works to examine the way language is used today through technology. The San Francisco based artist adapts phone texts that have been altered incorrectly through the use of auto correct. Her work poses questions regarding the quality of language and how we communicate/miscommunicate with one another.

 


 

 

LISA SOLOMON

JANUARY - MARCH 2019

Profoundly interested in the idea of hybridization (sparked from her Hapa heritage – she is ½ Japanese and ½ Caucasian), Solomon’s mixed media works revolve thematically around domesticity, craft, and masculinity/femininity, and often the pursuit of art as science/research. She is frankly obsessed with color/color theory and is drawn to found objects tending to alter them conceptually so that their meanings and original uses or intents are re-purposed. She often fuses “wrong” things together – re contextualizing their original purposes, and incorporating materials that inherently question and skirt the line between ART and CRAFT.