Paths, 2011, Gudny Campbell Silk charmeuse top, silk ribbon binding, silk batting, cotton backing, yarn, beads

Paths, 2011, Gudny Campbell

Silk charmeuse top, silk ribbon binding, silk batting, cotton backing, yarn, beads


Juncture 2: 40th Anniversary sjmqt member's exhibition

NOVEMBER 29, 2017 - JANUARY 14, 2018

 pORCELLA GALLERY

Now in its fortieth year, the San Jose Museum of Quilts & Textiles is at a juncture in time, where we can both reflect on the past and look forward to the future. A juncture can also be an intersection of place or events, often one laden with symbolic potential: In many folk traditions, junctures as represented by crossroads are a potent metaphor for transition. Though a juncture can be a time for reflection, the word can also describe a critical moment or crisis that demands immediate action. With the concept as their point of departure, artists may take the exhibitions theme for "juncture" where it leads them.

 

 

 

 


Expressions of Identity: 40th Anniversary Exhibition

October 20, 2017 - January 14, 2018

 All galleries excluding porcella gallery

Inserting one's identity is inherent in the process of an artist and their body of work. As San Jose Museum of Quilts & Textiles celebrates its 40th year, we reflect on our own identity and highlight pieces from the permanent collection acquired in the last five years. 

Millwheel Signature Quilt, 1844, Unknown maker Gift of Lea Russo and Bruce Berman, 2016.500.001

Millwheel Signature Quilt, 1844, Unknown maker

Gift of Lea Russo and Bruce Berman, 2016.500.001


Identity Tapestry at San Jose Museum of Quilts & Textiles, 2017

Identity Tapestry at San Jose Museum of Quilts & Textiles, 2017

Identity Tapestry: Mary Corey March

October 15, 2017 - January 14, 2018

hallway

Through a variety of mediums, artist Mary Corey March explores questions of individuality, humanity, data, and expression. March’s participatory installation Identity Tapestry will enlist SJMQT visitors in creating a portrait of our community.  

Participants choose a ball of yarn to trace along the framework of statements pinned to the wall. These statements begin with basic biographical information, such as “I am a woman,” but splinter off into more complex facets of identity: “I have seen someone dying,” “I stop to enjoy a beautiful moment,” “I am fortunate.” Connecting point to point with their yarn, participants trace out the paths of their identities, making visible the ways in which we are the same and different from one another. In each of its locations, including San Francisco, Pepperdine University, Southern Vermont College, and Pfäffikon, Switzerland, Identity Tapestry thus becomes a work of art as unique as the people who contribute to it.