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MIRIAM AT MOMA: MIRIAM NATHAN-ROBERTS, PERSONAL AND PUBLIC

OCTOBER 19 - NOV 25, 2018

PORCELLA GALLERY

SJMQT commemorates Miriam Nathan-Roberts, the late Bay Area art quilt pioneer.  The exhibit includes several of her iconic works as well as quilts and personal articles never before shown.  Nathan-Roberts was well known for illusions of 3D shapes on a 2D surface.  Her later work was distinguished by striking, digitally-printed images.  The title piece imagines a radical departure for the Museum of Modern Art in New York --- as a venue for art quilts. 


EXCELLENCE IN FIBERS, IN COLLABORATION WITH FIBER ART NOW MAGAZINE

OCTOBER 19, 2018 - JANUARY 13, 2019

TURNER AND GILLILAND GALLERIES

Fiber Art Now Magazine highlights innovative, contemporary textile art in the Excellence in Fibers issue. An exhibition of the same name, the work shows current trends in the categories of vessel forms/ basketry, installation, wall/ floor works, sculptural works, and wearables.

 

  (Hi)Stories Uncovered   Ali Ferguson Print & hand stitching on domestic textiles and vintage garments

(Hi)Stories Uncovered 
Ali Ferguson
Print & hand stitching on domestic textiles and vintage garments


  Empty Void 22,  2018 Artist's hair, Acrylic medium on panel

Empty Void 22, 2018
Artist's hair, Acrylic medium on panel

SEEING THE THRESHOLD: JAYOUNG YOON

OCTOBER 19, 2018 - JANUARY 13, 2019

HALLWAY GALLERY

Born in Korea, Jayoung Yoon is a New York based artist known for using human hair in her art. She focuses on using hair as a medium for exploring systems of thought, perception and sensations of the body. Her use of hair connects the viewer’s visual perception of the work to the physical form of the body. Her creations of 2 dimensional work, of both woven forms and geometric shapes, represent the limbo between conscious and unconscious states.

 


SUTURE AND STITCH: MARK NEWPORT

OCTOBER 19, 2018 - JANUARY 13, 2019

FINLAYSON GALLERY

For Mark Newport, textile and skin are intimately connected. Physical proximity causes sweat and strength, dirt and fear, love and cologne to move from flesh to cloth indiscriminately. While cloth protects skin, either can be cut or torn. Stitches are the means to aid healing and measure the intensity of the wound. 

These works begin by cutting a hole into the cloth. The hole is then filled by weaving with needle and thread. The repairs are made using traditional textile darning and mending techniques learned from studying European and American mending samplers. Whether the area of repair is immediately visible or camouflaged, mending holes leaves a scar that speaks of vulnerability, intimacy, and futility.

 Mark Newport  Redress 4,  2017 Embroidery on cotton

Mark Newport
Redress 4, 2017
Embroidery on cotton