Past Artists in Residence

 
 
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LIZ HARVEY

Spring 2018 ARTIST IN RESIDENCE

Liz Harvey is an interdisciplinary artist whose sculpture and performances have been shown in galleries, museums, and alternative spaces, including a national park, a riverbed, and an arroyo. Harvey works in sculpture and performance, drawing on craft processes to explore loss, history, and imagined futures. For her performance projects, she collaborates with musicians, sound artists, dancers and scientists. 

Harvey's work looks back and forward – she makes elegies and predictions. By engaging with “women’s handiwork”, her current work explores plant-human relationships. Most recently her work has focused on time - through considering the increased rate of plant extinctions and the ongoing decline of the planet’s biodiversity. Harvey’s work “actively engages the rich and multifarious history of feminist art practice, while also attesting to a highly personal and singular vision,” according to Los Angeles critic, artist and poet Eve Wood. 

Click here to see Liz Harvey's multiyear durational performance project, the lost ones.


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MICHELLE WILSON & ANNE BECK

WINTER 2018 ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE

Collaborative duo, Michelle Wilson, and Ann Beck bring us their Rhinoceros Project. Their participatory project is based on Albrecht Durer's print by the same name. Their work is a commentary on our environment and the extinction of species. During their residency, the two will facilitate sewing circles and paper-making happenings.

Click here for more info on The Rhinoceros Project.


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ROCOCO, KC ROSENBERG & MODESTO COVARRUBIAS

FALL 2017 ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE

The collaborative duo known as RoCoCo is comprised of KC Rosenberg and Modesto Covarrubias. These
interdisciplinary artists describe their practice as a dialog of making, and they are interested in the juxtaposition of materials and response to space (architectural and natural) in their exploration of complex emotional states, social justice, and contemporary culture. RoCoCo’s work most often takes form through sculptural installations, but has also included video, performance, drawing, painting, and audience participation. RoCoCo began collaborating in 2015 at Mercury 20 Gallery in Oakland, California, and has gone on to show work at the Oliver Arts Center in Oakland, and the Montalvo Arts Center in Saratoga. 


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HEATHER DEYLING

Summer 2017 Artist in Residence

Heather Deyling is an artist and educator whose current and ongoing body of work, the “Invented Hybrids” series, includes works in drawing, glass and fiber-based sculpture. Her studio practice is driven by research and observation of natural forms, such as succulents, fungi and marine invertebrates. 


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LAURIE SHAPIRO

Spring 2017 Artist in Residence

Laurie Shapiro’s large-scale, tapestry-like, mixed-media paintings are sometimes viewed from the wall and sometimes walked inside of.  Fascinated by color and process, Shapiro initially builds up her paintings by hand-sewing painted segments and drawn screen prints on raw muslin, followed by layers of over-painting.  From afar, her pieces look like paintings, but when viewed more closely, one can see the hand-stitching of her screen printed drawings.  A few artists she admires are Roy De Forest, Gustav Klimt, and Kerry James Marshall.


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CRISTINA VELAZQUEZ

Winter 2017 Artist in Residence

Cristina Velázquez is an interdisciplinary visual artist who reuses and transforms everyday obsolete objects into works of art, addressing feminist and ecological issues through the term Ecofeminism. Velázquez earned a Bachelors of Fine Art with a concentration in painting from San Jose State University in 2001, and a Masters of Arts and Masters of Fine Arts, Dual Degree from San Francisco Art Institute in 2017.


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AMY AHLSTROM

Fall 2016 Artist in Residence

Amy Ahlstrom is an urban quilter creating modern pop art. Inspired by the street art, signage, and graffiti in city neighborhoods, Amy takes digital photos of found images, sampling and remixing them into urban quilts. Using hundreds of digital photographs, she designs collages by computer, makes paper patterns, and hand-cuts and sews quilts. The resulting quilts, made of silk and cotton and stretched onto frames, are tactile visual postcards of urban environments. They re-imagine the urban landscape and re-invent quilting as a pop art medium.