Denise Labadie: Stone Portraits and Sacred Stonescapes
June 5 – July 14, 2019
Porcella Gallery 

Labadie makes contemporary art quilt portraits of Celtic megalithic stones and monoliths, and more recent monastic ruins. These stonescapes – stone circles, standing stones, dolmens, burial tombs, abandoned churches, forgotten cemeteries, and lost-in-history portals and passageways – are both timeless and evoke deep remembrances of human pasts largely forgotten. Labadie's quilts are known both for their surprising emotionality, large size and, from a construction standpoint, their hand-painted fabrics, textures, color gradation, shadowing and perspective, depth of field, craftsmanship and technique precision. 


Bonamargy Friary , 2018 52 x 43" Hand-painted cotton fabrics; reverse, turned edge, and raw edge appliqué; machine appliquéd, pieced, and quilted

Bonamargy Friary, 2018
52 x 43"
Hand-painted cotton fabrics; reverse, turned edge, and raw edge appliqué; machine appliquéd, pieced, and quilted


Ceremonial huipil (woman’s blouse) Santa Lucía Utatlán 1930’s/1940’s

Ceremonial huipil (woman’s blouse)
Santa Lucía Utatlán
1930’s/1940’s

Mayan Traje: A Tradition in Transition
JULY 21, 2019 – OCTOBER 13, 2019
TURNER AND GILLILAND GALLERIES

The Maya of Guatemala are known worldwide for their excellent weaving and distinctive trajes (traditional clothing). These were once 100% village-specific, and people could be recognized as being from a specific place. Over time, many and diverse influences have caused significant change -- but even so, visitors are struck by the ubiquitous nature of indigenous weaving and the persistence of their “wearable art”. This exhibit will show outstanding examples of clothing from the early 20th century to contemporary fashion, highlight key differences, and explore some of the reasons for these changes. On view will be individual pieces as well as full trajes – none created for tourist markets. These will be drawn from the rarely-displayed collection of the Friends of the Ixchel Museum.

www.ixchelfriends.org


La Vie de Bohème
July 21, 2019 – October 13, 2019
Finlayson Gallery

La Vie de Bohème celebrates the collaboration between two San Jose cultural institutions, San Jose Museum of Quilts & Textiles and Opera San José. Showcasing costumes, illustrations and props from SJ Opera's production of La Bohème, the costumes illuminate the story of a group of bohemians, and how their lives become intertwined. Although the novel was set in Paris in the 1840s, the costumes in this exhibition represent the 1920s.

Costume Designer: Alina Bokovikova
Costume Director: Alyssa Oania

This exhibition and costumes on display are generously underwritten by Mary and Clint Gilliland.

https://www.operasj.org/

Alina Bokovikova Mimi, Act 1   Pencil on paper, watercolor

Alina Bokovikova
Mimi, Act 1
Pencil on paper, watercolor


Chinese silk embroidery from SNAD's collection

Chinese silk embroidery from SNAD's collection


Borders
July 31, 2019 – October 13, 2019
Hallway Gallery

Explore selected works from San Francisco School of Needlework & Design's Stitch-at-Home Challenge: Borders.

A border is a moat between a castle and its kingdom. A border runs along the hem of our jeans. A boundary, a selvage, a crease, an end and a beginning, a divider and a unifier: a border is all of these at once. Borders are both metaphorical and literal––some are fixed while others have fluidity and movement. Our internal boundaries serve to protect us from real or perceived dangers and help to delineate the furthest reaches of our moods and feelings. Externally, borders are both visual and physical structures that serve to define lands, politics, cultures and linguistic variations. They shift like the high tide line, results of geopolitical incidents, and within each of us as we learn, grow and develop. Sawtooth borders, hemstitched borders, open borders, white picket fences, brick walls, arched openings, drawnwork, or tiny dashed running stitch lines. Visible and invisible, comforting and discomforting, fixed and fluid….all around us.


Gems from our PasT
August 28, 2019 – October 13, 2019
PORCELLA GALLERY

Ranging from 1850 to 1940, SJMQT showcases classic quilts from San Jose Museum of Quilts & Textile's permanent collection. Curated by Ashley Elieff, Collections Manager at SJMQT, this show highlights the bright, high-contrast, and bold prints of the museum's diverse quilt assortment.


Unknown Artist  Prince’s Feather Quilt,  1880-1900 82 x 67" Cotton Hand appliqued, hand quilted

Unknown Artist
Prince’s Feather Quilt, 1880-1900
82 x 67"
Cotton
Hand appliqued, hand quilted


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Know Your Meme: Stitching Viral Phenomena
October 20, 2019 – January 12, 2020
Turner and Gilliland Galleries

The exhibition explores the concept of the meme as a poignant method to summarize, understand, critique and share thoughts on important societal issues. In true meme fashion, the artwork selection will be driven by the power of the people, curated by the online community, and will encourage the general public to participate in the exhibition process. All artworks must depict, relate to or reference a meme through a textile method such as quilting, embroidery, cross- stitching, knitting and crocheting, weaving, basketry, etc.


PANTEA KARIMI: FORGOTTEN WOMEN OF SCIENCE
JANUARY 19, 2020 – MARCH 1, 2020
PORCELLA GALLERY

History shows that there were many powerful and intelligent women who enjoyed professional careers in a wide range of scientific fields. Women scientists have long been under-represented and sometimes forgotten in historical accounts and scientific textbooks. These women did not just assume marginalized roles in the oft male-dominated fields of science; they were also pioneers and generators of cutting-edge ideas. Forgotten Women of Science features lesser acknowledged female scientists from ancient times to the nineteenth century. The exhibition highlights their contributions and chronicles their struggles in the scientific field.

Pantea Karimi  #Hypatia , 2018 Silkscreen and color graphite on paper

Pantea Karimi
#Hypatia, 2018
Silkscreen and color graphite on paper


Shirley Cunningham  Bounty: Fowls for the air  48 x 66" Vintage fabric, thread Photo by Dennis Fagan

Shirley Cunningham
Bounty: Fowls for the air
48 x 66"
Vintage fabric, thread
Photo by Dennis Fagan

Shirley Cunningham and Marianne Lettieri:
Never Ending Thread
JANUARY 19 – APRIL 12, 2020
FINLAYSON GALLERY

Cunningham and Lettieri juxtapose their independent art installations to create a space for poetic reverie. Working with re-purposed materials, needle, thread, light and shadow, they explore cultural, spiritual, and material translations of objects, symbols, and text through the aesthetics of craft and design. Cunningham retells an ancient creation story in imaginary tapestry, transforming garments through painterly stitches and skillful embellishment. Lettieri re-contextualizes a thousand articles of estate crochet to make a new narrative about individual identity, community, and creativity. Together, the artists engage the infinite thread that runs through time.