Honoring the Heroines of the Civil Rights Movement: Patricia A. Montgomery

September 5 - October 14, 2018

Porcella Gallery

Patricia A. Montgomery's swing coats illustrate African America women's contributions to the Civil Rights Movement.  Each coat represents one unsung heroine such as Ella Josephine Baker, who mentored young civil rights leaders, or Claudette Colvin, a teenager who refused to give up her seat on a segregated bus in Montgomery, Alabama nine months before Rosa Parks’ arrest.

The combination of African American quilting traditions, digital images, pastel drawings and thread work are designed into a wearable object, detailing the stories of the Civil Rights Movement heroines.

  (Daisy Bates) The Mentor,  2015 Quilted swing coat

(Daisy Bates) The Mentor, 2015
Quilted swing coat


  (Hi)Stories Uncovered   Ali Ferguson Print & hand stitching on domestic textiles and vintage garments   

(Hi)Stories Uncovered 
Ali Ferguson
Print & hand stitching on domestic textiles and vintage garments

 

Excellence in Fibers, In Collaboration with Fiber Art Now Magazine

October 19, 2018 - January 13, 2019

Turner and Gilliland Galleries

Fiber Art Now Magazine highlights innovative, contemporary textile art in the Excellence in Fibers issue. An exhibition of the same name, the work shows current trends in the categories of vessel forms/ basketry, installation, wall/ floor works, sculptural works, and wearables.

 


  Empty Void   22,  2018 Artist's hair, Acrylic medium on panel

Empty Void 22, 2018
Artist's hair, Acrylic medium on panel

Seeing the Threshold: Jayoung Yoon

October 19, 2018 - January 13, 2019

Hallway Gallery

Born in Korea, Jayoung Yoon is a New York based artist known for using human hair in her art. She focuses on using hair as a medium for exploring systems of thought, perception and sensations of the body. Her use of hair connects the viewer’s visual perception of the work to the physical form of the body. Her creations of 2 dimensional work, of both woven forms and geometric shapes, represent the limbo between conscious and unconscious states.


 Judith Content  Under Current , 2017 Hand dyed silk Pieced and quilted

Judith Content
Under Current, 2017
Hand dyed silk
Pieced and quilted

Judith Content, Solo Exhibition

January 21, 2019 - April 14, 2019

Finlayson Gallery

Palo Alto based artist, Judith Content, explores the essence of image, memory or a moment in time through the process of hand dying and stitched silk. Through discharge dyeing and shibori dyeing techniques, Content's work references the natural landscape with painterly movement and depth.


Kristin Martincic: Swim Club

April 21 - July 14, 2019

Hallway Gallery

Kristen Martincic uses swimwear as a surrogate for the female body, creating paper bathing suits that are a cross between a bathing suit and an underdress, skin and clothing. Social conventions and context play a significant role in how these garments are viewed by others and ourselves. These delicate paper suits talk about the awkwardness of vulnerability and exposure while maintaining a sense of levity. 

 Golden U-back suit, 2012 Ink on matsuo kozo, thread Monotype on matsuo kozo, stitching  Photo: Jeffrey M. Bruce 

Golden U-back suit, 2012
Ink on matsuo kozo, thread
Monotype on matsuo kozo, stitching
Photo: Jeffrey M. Bruce 


 Ceremonial huipil (woman’s blouse) Santa Lucía Utatlán 1930’s/1940’s

Ceremonial huipil (woman’s blouse)
Santa Lucía Utatlán
1930’s/1940’s

Mayan Traje: A Tradition in Transition

JULY 21, 2019 – OCTOBER 13, 2019

TURNER AND GILLILAND GALLERIES

The Maya of Guatemala are known worldwide for their excellent weaving and distinctive trajes (traditional clothing). These were once 100% village-specific, and people could be recognized as being from a specific place. Over time, many and diverse influences have caused significant change -- but even so, visitors are struck by the ubiquitous nature of indigenous weaving and the persistence of their “wearable art”. This exhibit will show outstanding examples of clothing from the early 20th century to contemporary fashion, highlight key differences, and explore some of the reasons for these changes. On view will be individual pieces as well as full trajes – none created for tourist markets. These will be drawn from the rarely-displayed collection of the Friends of the Ixchel Museum.

www.ixchelfriends.org