International TECHstyle Art Biennial IV

January 20, 2019 – April 14, 2019

Hallway, Porcella, Turner and Gilliland Galleries

In 2010, the San Jose Museum of Quilts & Textiles launched its signature event, the International TECHstyle Art Biennial (ITAB). Returning now for its fourth incarnation, ITAB is a juried exhibition of work by artists merging fiber media with new information and communication technologies in their artistic processes, as a medium of artistic expression, and/or in the content of their work. Leveraging its location in Silicon Valley, ITAB serves as the premiere platform for introducing the work of artists exploring the intersection of fiber and technology to a global community.

 Janice Lessman-Moss  #460, Casting Shadows , 2017 Silk, linen Digital jacquard, hand woven TC2 loom, painted warp and weft

Janice Lessman-Moss
#460, Casting Shadows, 2017
Silk, linen
Digital jacquard, hand woven TC2 loom, painted warp and weft


 Judith Content  Under Current , 2017 Hand dyed silk Pieced and quilted

Judith Content
Under Current, 2017
Hand dyed silk
Pieced and quilted

Evanescence: Judith Content

January 20, 2019 - April 14, 2019

Finlayson Gallery

Palo Alto based artist, Judith Content, explores the essence of image, memory or a moment in time through the process of hand dying and stitched silk. Through discharge dyeing and shibori dyeing techniques, Content's work references the natural landscape with painterly movement and depth.


H2Oh!

Turner and Gilliland Galleries

April 21 - July 14, 2019

Water - it's everywhere! The majority of the earth's surface is covered by water. More than half of the human body consists of water. Every living thing depends on water to survive, and life hangs in the balance when this precious resource is squandered. Offering a variety of artistic interpretations, H2Oh! draws on a well of beauty, reverence, and contemplation as it invites viewers to consider the importance and the impact of water, one of the most vital, desired, powerful, sacred, and enjoyed resources on earth.

 Chiaki Dosho  Light & Dark 11  Japanese kimono (silk, synthetic fiber) Direct appliqué

Chiaki Dosho
Light & Dark 11
Japanese kimono (silk, synthetic fiber)
Direct appliqué


 Golden U-back suit, 2012 Ink on matsuo kozo, thread Monotype on matsuo kozo, stitching  Photo: Jeffrey M. Bruce

Golden U-back suit, 2012
Ink on matsuo kozo, thread
Monotype on matsuo kozo, stitching
Photo: Jeffrey M. Bruce

Kristen Martincic: Swim Club

April 21 - July 14, 2019

Hallway Gallery

Kristen Martincic uses swimwear as a surrogate for the female body, creating paper bathing suits that are a cross between a bathing suit and an underdress, skin and clothing. Social conventions and context play a significant role in how these garments are viewed by others and ourselves. These delicate paper suits talk about the awkwardness of vulnerability and exposure while maintaining a sense of levity. 


Momentary & Timeless

Porcella Gallery 

April 21- June 2, 2019

Momentary & Timeless invites you to join six Bay Area fiber artists as they explore various ideas through a combination of haiku and the art quilt. Each artist presents a unique style that will draw you into the rhythm of the exhibit. You will be invited to write your own haiku and hang it on a “wishing tree” – a uniquely Japanese tradition.

  Morning Fog  Robin Cowley Silk, cotton Machine sewn and fused

Morning Fog Robin Cowley
Silk, cotton
Machine sewn and fused


 Ceremonial huipil (woman’s blouse) Santa Lucía Utatlán 1930’s/1940’s

Ceremonial huipil (woman’s blouse)
Santa Lucía Utatlán
1930’s/1940’s

Mayan Traje: A Tradition in Transition

JULY 21, 2019 – OCTOBER 13, 2019

TURNER AND GILLILAND GALLERIES

The Maya of Guatemala are known worldwide for their excellent weaving and distinctive trajes (traditional clothing). These were once 100% village-specific, and people could be recognized as being from a specific place. Over time, many and diverse influences have caused significant change -- but even so, visitors are struck by the ubiquitous nature of indigenous weaving and the persistence of their “wearable art”. This exhibit will show outstanding examples of clothing from the early 20th century to contemporary fashion, highlight key differences, and explore some of the reasons for these changes. On view will be individual pieces as well as full trajes – none created for tourist markets. These will be drawn from the rarely-displayed collection of the Friends of the Ixchel Museum.

www.ixchelfriends.org